Unpaid carers in Sheffield felt lack of support and worse mental health post pandemic

24 February 2022

Unpaid carers in Sheffield felt that they needed more help since the start of the pandemic, according to a council report.

The results of a questionnaire carried out in The Carers Centre Trust in Sheffield were released in the council’s annual Annual Equalities Report 2020/2021

The findings of the questionnaire indicated lack of help for carers was having an impact as well as worsening mental and physical health.

There were 313 respondents to the questionnaire and the key findings included 58% of carers said the person/people they care for needed more help since the start of Coronavirus in addition to 68% of carers which felt that their mental wellbeing had got worse since the start of the pandemic.

The report revealed how demand for the trust services has soared, with 1809 new carers registered in just over a year taking the total to 12,962.

It adds “This has meant that carers have continued to receive support when they have needed it the most. As restrictions have continued to ease though the impact of the pandemic on the mental health and general wellbeing of carers is still obvious. The Carers Centre have reported that the carers they work with continue to experience more complex and challenging circumstances due to Coronavirus.”

Other findings indicated 56% of carers would like more help in order to manage their caring role.

In the same time period which was between April 2020 and July 2021 carers for the trust Delivered 869 Tier 1 and 41 Tier 2 risk assessments when carrying out their work.

The council said that the report shows that although restrictions have continued to ease the impact of the pandemic on the mental health and general wellbeing of carers is still obvious. 

The report also claimed in response to the pandemic, the Carers Centre has increased its capacity to provide weekly social and check-in phone calls, zoom meetings and small group meetings and support for carers.

 

 

 

Written by James Dugdale

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